The Survivor Truck, built to drive through the end of the world

"Sometimes," author William S. Burroughs once said, "paranoia is just having all the facts."

First I was afraid, I was petrified..."Sometimes," author William S. Burroughs once said, "paranoia is just having all the facts." Given the facts gathered from the past few natural and man-made disasters, it's not a surprise that many people have begun to think of what they'd need to survive the next calamity. One California man has taken a kitchen-sink approach and created the Survivor Truck -- a machine that could keep rolling through any given Armageddon.

Jim DeLozier, who sells survival goods in Costa Mesa, Calif., says the idea of the Survivor Truck was to build the ultimate rolling outpost, one that could withstand even a nuclear attack. Starting with a Chevy C70 truck powered by 150-gallon tanks of gasoline or propane, DeRozier outfitted the chassis with every conceivable piece of equipment needed to travel through a disaster. "My goal was to build a vehicle that can go anywhere you want to go, stay as long as you want and drive back out," DeLozier says.

On the outside, the truck gets bulletproof shielding, a filtration system to keep chemical agents out of the cabin and even a coating of pickup truck bedliner. Night vision helps keep watch on what's happening when the lights go out, while a solar generator can provide power for the array of communications gear during daylight hours. On the inside, there's enough water, food, toilets and battery power to keep a group of people not just alive but comfortable for months amidst chaos. If parked in the wilderness, the top platform includes a complete camping unit and inflatable raft, along with a water purification system; if there's some need for an aggressive response, the truck has a protected sniper's cage and a backup crossbow and arrows.

While DeLozier says he originally conceived the truck as the ultimate survivalist driving machine -- with a price that runs between $100,000 and $600,000 -- he's received more interest from military and law enforcement agencies mulling a rolling command center. He says he's somewhat surprised by the attention his concept has received, "whether it's the zombie apocalypse fad or whether people believe they have a potential need....it's designed to be a home away from home." Given how many people have seen their homes washed away or destroyed in recent years, it's no wonder there's some demand for something that could outrun trouble.